Notable Music Featured in Fox’s Hit Show, House

Music is an important aspect of television and movies as it clues in the viewer to certain feelings and helps to character build. One of my favorite television shows, Fox’s House MD, features a variety of musical numbers. Multi-talented thespian, Hugh Laurie, plays the arrogant and antisocial but brilliant diagnostician Gregory House. Music can help tell a story and the producers of House MD wisely choose numbers that evoke emotion.

The most notable piece of music associated with the series is the opening credits theme. It is a lovely piece and melds well with the opening montage. Titled “Teardrop,” it is performed by Massive Attack. Interesting, considering that House’s disability was caused by an infarction in his leg muscle. To state it more plainly, a “massive attack.”

In the very first episode of the series, simply known as “Pilot”, Dean of Medicine and hospital administrator, Lisa Cuddy, struggles to persuade Dr. House to comply with the terms of his contract with the hospital. Feeling flustered, she says, “I want you to do your job!” The quick-witted House refers to ‘philosopher Jagger’ and quotes him as saying, “you can’t always get what you want.” Later, Cuddy, who often matches wits with House, thinks of a number of ways to motivate House to take responsibility. She explains to him that she has researched the great ‘philosopher Jagger’ and found that although it is true that “you can’t always get what you want, if you try sometimes, you get what you need.” Therefore, I find it fitting that the closing scenes of the pilot episode were accompanied by the song “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” by The Rolling Stones. This particular music is used often in the series, usually being played during the ending credits.

The episode entitled “Damned if You Do” features a very talented Hugh Laurie as House playing the piano. He plunks out a beautiful rendition of “Silent Night,” revealing a bit of his softer side. I’ve chosen to include it in this list because the scene is very moving as it brings the Christmas themed show to a close.

In “Detox,” Cuddy challenges House to stay off Vicodin for one week. If he can do it, she’ll forgive him one month of clinic duty. House endures a very difficult week and at the end of the episode, we see House happily buzzed on Vicodin, while “Feelin’ Alright” by Joe Cocker plays in the background. This is obviously indicative of the way House feels once back to taking is medication.

The very intense “Euphoria (Part Two)” portrays a distressed Foreman dealing with an unknown, horrifying disease. Near the end of the episode, when it appears that everything may turn out okay, the music “One Safe Place” by Mark Cohn plays in the background. This seems to signify that perhaps the hospital is Foreman’s safe place to be.

Often, episodes of House can be difficult to watch since they deal with sensitive subject matter. “Forever” is just such a show when Dr. Chase must perform a biopsy on an infant. Not only is it difficult for him to do the operation on the tiny, lifeless baby, he feels guilt that he may have caused the baby’s death. After Chase says a prayer, the song “Over Yonder” as sung by the American Boychoir plays softly during the procedure. It seems to portray the sadness of the situation yet at the same time suggests that perhaps the baby has moved on to a better place.

One of my favorite scenes is the opening of “Meaning.” The song “Feel Good Inc.” by the Gorillaz plays as House jogs to work. This is one of my favorite songs and has a very catchy, upbeat tune. What a good choice of music to convey what House is feeling while doing this thing he has not been able to do for such a long time.

“Informed Consent” features a famed cancer researcher struck by a mystifying illness. As the team desperately tries to diagnose the old man within a short time frame, they find out that he no longer wants to live. In the end, the old man gets his wish. The song “Into Dust” by Mazzy Star concludes the show suggesting that we all turn to dust at some point.

In another touching show, “Lines in the Sand,” House struggles to diagnose the symptoms of a ten year old autistic boy. House works relentlessy to complete any test he thinks will help the uncooperative child. At the end of the episode, the boy seems to understand what House has done for him and gives the doctor his most prized possession; his favorite toy. For the first time in the boy’s life, he makes eye contact with someone; House. “Waiting on an Angel” by Ben Harper plays during the scene. Could Dr. House be the boy’s angel? Or is it the other way around?

A brief snippet of another catchy tune is played during “Family” just after House purchases a new cane to replace the one that Wilson’s dog used as his chew toy. The cane he chooses can only be described as “Bitchin'” Most people have heard the song “Highway to Hell” by AC/DC and can see the significance of the ditty when House limps into his office sporting his flame cane. He will tell you it makes him appear to be moving faster. As long as AC/DC is playing, I think I have to agree!

One of the more recent episodes, “Frozen” features the song “Let’s Get It On” by Marvin Gaye. This one bears mentioning since the main guest character comments on its use. House has to give a long distance physical exam to Cate, a young psychiatrist with a mysterious medical condition. She is trapped in the South Pole, so they use video conferencing to communicate and attempt a diagnosis. The depraved doctor is obviously attracted to this young woman and in an attempt to court her in his own warped way, he plays the music as he instructs her on performing the exam. The patient seems to get a kick out of it until something is discovered during the exam.

Music is an important aspect of television and movies as it clues in the viewer to certain feelings and helps to character build. One of my favorite television shows, Fox’s House MD, features a variety of musical numbers. Multi-talented thespian, Hugh Laurie, plays the arrogant and antisocial but brilliant diagnostician Gregory House. Music can help tell a story and the producers of House MD wisely choose numbers that evoke emotion.

The most notable piece of music associated with the series is the opening credits theme. It is a lovely piece and melds well with the opening montage. Titled “Teardrop,” it is performed by Massive Attack. Interesting, considering that House’s disability was caused by an infarction in his leg muscle. To state it more plainly, a “massive attack.”

In the very first episode of the series, simply known as “Pilot”, Dean of Medicine and hospital administrator, Lisa Cuddy, struggles to persuade Dr. House to comply with the terms of his contract with the hospital. Feeling flustered, she says, “I want you to do your job!” The quick-witted House refers to ‘philosopher Jagger’ and quotes him as saying, “you can’t always get what you want.” Later, Cuddy, who often matches wits with House, thinks of a number of ways to motivate House to take responsibility. She explains to him that she has researched the great ‘philosopher Jagger’ and found that although it is true that “you can’t always get what you want, if you try sometimes, you get what you need.” Therefore, I find it fitting that the closing scenes of the pilot episode were accompanied by the song “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” by The Rolling Stones. This particular music is used often in the series, usually being played during the ending credits.

The episode entitled “Damned if You Do” features a very talented Hugh Laurie as House playing the piano. He plunks out a beautiful rendition of “Silent Night,” revealing a bit of his softer side. I’ve chosen to include it in this list because the scene is very moving as it brings the Christmas themed show to a close.

In “Detox,” Cuddy challenges House to stay off Vicodin for one week. If he can do it, she’ll forgive him one month of clinic duty. House endures a very difficult week and at the end of the episode, we see House happily buzzed on Vicodin, while “Feelin’ Alright” by Joe Cocker plays in the background. This is obviously indicative of the way House feels once back to taking is medication.

The very intense “Euphoria (Part Two)” portrays a distressed Foreman dealing with an unknown, horrifying disease. Near the end of the episode, when it appears that everything may turn out okay, the music “One Safe Place” by Mark Cohn plays in the background. This seems to signify that perhaps the hospital is Foreman’s safe place to be.

Often, episodes of House can be difficult to watch since they deal with sensitive subject matter. “Forever” is just such a show when Dr. Chase must perform a biopsy on an infant. Not only is it difficult for him to do the operation on the tiny, lifeless baby, he feels guilt that he may have caused the baby’s death. After Chase says a prayer, the song “Over Yonder” as sung by the American Boychoir plays softly during the procedure. It seems to portray the sadness of the situation yet at the same time suggests that perhaps the baby has moved on to a better place.

One of my favorite scenes is the opening of “Meaning.” The song “Feel Good Inc.” by the Gorillaz plays as House jogs to work. This is one of my favorite songs and has a very catchy, upbeat tune. What a good choice of music to convey what House is feeling while doing this thing he has not been able to do for such a long time.

“Informed Consent” features a famed cancer researcher struck by a mystifying illness. As the team desperately tries to diagnose the old man within a short time frame, they find out that he no longer wants to live. In the end, the old man gets his wish. The song “Into Dust” by Mazzy Star concludes the show suggesting that we all turn to dust at some point.

In another touching show, “Lines in the Sand,” House struggles to diagnose the symptoms of a ten year old autistic boy. House works relentlessy to complete any test he thinks will help the uncooperative child. At the end of the episode, the boy seems to understand what House has done for him and gives the doctor his most prized possession; his favorite toy. For the first time in the boy’s life, he makes eye contact with someone; House. “Waiting on an Angel” by Ben Harper plays during the scene. Could Dr. House be the boy’s angel? Or is it the other way around?

A brief snippet of another catchy tune is played during “Family” just after House purchases a new cane to replace the one that Wilson’s dog used as his chew toy. The cane he chooses can only be described as “Bitchin'” Most people have heard the song “Highway to Hell” by AC/DC and can see the significance of the ditty when House limps into his office sporting his flame cane. He will tell you it makes him appear to be moving faster. As long as AC/DC is playing, I think I have to agree!

One of the more recent episodes, “Frozen” features the song “Let’s Get It On” by Marvin Gaye. This one bears mentioning since the main guest character comments on its use. House has to give a long distance physical exam to Cate, a young psychiatrist with a mysterious medical condition. She is trapped in the South Pole, so they use video conferencing to communicate and attempt a diagnosis. The depraved doctor is obviously attracted to this young woman and in an attempt to court her in his own warped way, he plays the music as he instructs her on performing the exam. The patient seems to get a kick out of it until something is discovered during the exam.

House MD is one of the best shows on television today. The music is carefully chosen by the producers to convey the meaning of the scene, engage the viewers, touch their deepest emotions, involve them in the story and keep them ‘coming back for more.’

House MD is one of the best shows on television today. The music is carefully chosen by the producers to convey the meaning of the scene, engage the viewers, touch their deepest emotions, involve them in the story and keep them ‘coming back for more.’

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